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  • G Park4, Jeffrey Hausdorff5, Michael Fox6, Lewis R Sudarsky7, Daniel Tarsy

  • 13 July 2021 by 0 Comments

G Park4, Jeffrey Hausdorff5, Michael Fox6, Lewis R Sudarsky7, Daniel Tarsy6, James Novakowski2, Eric A Macklin8, Peter M Wayne2 1 Department of Nursing, Chungnam National University, Daejeon, 301747, South Korea; 2 Osher Center for Integrative Medicine, Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA 02215, United States; 3 Physical Medicine Rehabilitation, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, United States; 4 Nursing, Woosong College, Daejeon, South Korea; 5 Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv-Yafo, Israel; 6 Neurology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, United States; 7 Neurology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA, United States; 8 Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, United States PubMed ID:https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19118039 Correspondence: Rhayun Song (songry@cnu.ac.kr) BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine 2017, 17(Suppl 1):P149 Purpose Using a meta-analytic approach, this study aimed to systematically evaluate and quantify the effects of Tai Chi on motor (UPDRS III, gait, balance, TUG, 6mw, and falls) and non-motor outcomes (quality of life, depression/mood) in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD). Methods A PRISMA guided systematic search targeted randomized trials evaluating Tai Chi for individuals with PD published from January 1980 through August 2016. CMA V.3 was used to estimate effect sizes (Hedge”s g) and publication bias. Results Fifteen RCTs were included in quantitative synthesis. Comparison groups included no treatment or usual care group (n = 7, 47 ) and exercise control group (n = 8, 53 ). Duration of Tai Chi ranged from PubMed ID:https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12684317 2 to 6 months. Tai Chi was associated with significant improvement on all motor outcomes (UPDRS III [ES = 0.379, p < .001], balance [ES = 0.356, p < .001], 6mw Iproniazid [ES = 0.533, p < .001], TUG [ES = 0.341, p = .005], and falls [ES = .403, p = .004]) except maximum gait speed (ES = 0.128, p = .22) and both non-motor outcomes (quality of life [ES = 0.322, p = .007], depression/mood [ES = 0.436, p = .001]). Funnel plots suggested some degree of publication bias. Conclusion Evidence supports a potential benefit of Tai Chi for improving motor and non-motor outcomes for individuals with PD, but results must be interpreted cautiously due to methodological bias in many studies. Additional large rigorous trials are warranted to better characterize the effects of Tai Chi in PD and to guide selection of optimal doses and specific protocols for individuals with different constellations of symptoms. P150 A mixed-method feasibility study evaluating Tai Chi in stroke rehabilitation Rhayun Song1, Inok Hwang2, Sukhee Ahn1, Myung-Ah Lee3, Peter M Wayne4, Min K Sohn2 1 Department of Nursing, Chungnam National University, Daejeon, 301747, South Korea; 2 Chungnam National University Hospital, Daejeon, South Korea; 3 Kinesiology, Recreation and Sport, Indiana State University, Terre Haute, IN, United States; 4 Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02215, United States Correspondence: Rhayun Song (songry@cnu.ac.kr) BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine 2017, 17(Suppl 1):PPurpose To employ a mixed method design including quantitative and qualitative assessments to examine the feasibility and effectiveness of a Tai Chi for stroke rehabilitation program. Methods A convenience sample of stroke survivors with hemiplegia was recruited for a Sun-style Tai Chi program adapted for stroke survivors, delivered twice weekly for 12 months. Physical function (strength, flexibility, balance, and mobility), self-efficacy.

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